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Missing Ohio State football player Kosta Karageorge found dead

Ohio State Mens Wrestling

OSU redshirt-senior defensive lineman Kosta Karageorge Credit: Courtesy of OSU

A body found near East Sixth and Courtland avenues has been identified as that of a missing Ohio State football player, Columbus Police Sgt. Richard Weiner said.

Redshirt-senior defensive lineman Kosta Karageorge’s body was found Sunday at about 2:30 p.m. in a dumpster. Tattoos confirmed his identity. It was unclear how long his body had been there, Weiner said.

Karageorge appeared to have died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. A handgun was found near the scene. Weiner said the body will be taken to the Franklin County morgue for more tests.

Karageorge had been missing since Wednesday at about 2 a.m. His sister, Sophia Karageorge, told The Columbus Dispatch on Thursday that he was last seen at his apartment on East 7th Avenue before he left to take a walk.

OSU’s Department of Athletics issued a statement after Karageorge was identified, saying the department was “shocked and saddened” to learn of his death.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the Karageorge family, and those who knew him, during this most difficult time,” the statement read.

Karageorge joined the football team in August as a walk on, and was a member of the OSU wrestling team since 2011.

The investigation is ongoing.

OSU offers suicide prevention resources. The Office of Student Life’s Counseling and Consultation Services can be reached at 614-292-5766. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255 or online at suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

18 comments

  1. I am so sorry.

  2. So sorry for his family and loved ones.rest in peace young man

  3. Very sad that our students are committing suicide. The best ones…with great futures ahead.

  4. Mr. Karageorge suffered concussions and confusion spells.
    When do we as a culture stop pretending that these players can give informed consent to the risk of concussive encepthalopathy?

    How many of these sad stories must we have before Universities acknowledging the contradiction between educating a brain while traumatizing it?
    Steve Miles, MD

  5. This young man’s death is extremely sad and tragic.

    I’m curious about a couple things.

    Regarding the issue of concussions, I read this paragraph in The Columbus Dispatch:

    “The walk-on senior defensive lineman was reported missing by his family after he left his apartment about 2 a.m. Wednesday. Shortly before he left, he sent a text to his mother apologizing ‘if I am an embarrassment, but these concussions have my head all f—ed up.'”

    He just joined the football team in August and only played in one game, so could the concussions he alluded to be from elsewhere? Perhaps from his high school football days?

    Also, with regard to him being found in a dumpster, how many people get into a dumpster to commit suicide? I’ve never heard of that happening before? Is this being investigated? I hope there will be sensible explanations about these issues.

    In any case, my deepest condolences are with the young man’s family and friends.

  6. “How many of these sad stories must we have before Universities acknowledging the contradiction between educating a brain while traumatizing it?”

    Great comment, Dr. Miles.

  7. Sympathies and prayers go out to the Karageorge family. Before many of us start making judgements of what they “think” happened, let’s have this terrible tragedy runs its course to confirm what happened.

  8. Such a tragedy. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family, teammates and friends.

    Also, shamefully poor job by the Lantern covering this story. An 11 sentence article for one of the biggest stories of the year. There should be team reporting on a story as big as this.

  9. Agree with BuckeyeinDC. I know everyone is returning to campus after Thanksgiving, but I hope there is some in-depth reporting this week about Mr. Karageorge’s life and what may have caused his apparent tragic suicide. My condolences to his family and friends and I hope he is resting in peace.

  10. Carla Banks-Williams

    Dr. Miles, I so agree. Pat, ad to your comment:
    Also, with regard to him being found in a dumpster, how many people get into a dumpster to commit suicide? I’ve never heard of that happening before? Is this being investigated? I hope there will be sensible explanations about these issues.

    I thought the same thing. Hopefully, more investigations will turn up the truth.

  11. Gene Smith doesn’t even have the decency to come out and make a personal statement on this from behind the giant pile of money he is hiding behind.

  12. It clearly states the young man wrestled for OSU for 3 yrs and was a walk on to the football team in August. Concussions happen in many contact sports also once you receive one you are more prone to receiving more. Some people recover and have no lingering affects while others have to stop contact sports all together or possibley be benched for the remainder of the season and miss playing in one of the greatest rivalry games ever. Thus possibley making the young person feel like a disappointment or failure to his family. Couple that with lifes ups and downs and headaches and confusion spells and you have kid full of turmoil. As for choosing the dumpster many people choose this to spare their family and he didnt have his vehicle so he needed to do this somewhere ‘private’ no long drawn out story line just short and simple. Go play armchair detective somewhere else.

  13. As former police reporter and city editor for The Lantern, good article. And maybe the concussions came from wrestling?

  14. Words cannot express how badly I feel for this grieving family as they mourn this poor young man.
    May God rest his soul and over time help to heal his family.

  15. People commit suicide in dumpsters (among other places). See Ottumna 2014, MTSU 2009, Federal Heights 2011.
    I completely agree with extending deep condolences to the family on their loss. But if this man is not to have died in vain, we must now allow this time for condolences to allow us to move on until the next one. He was injured. He played. The athletic programs (and its non-independent medical staff) which ignored the data, set the rules, implemented the policies, and minimized the trauma are in part responsible. Memorializing this death means being honest about his medical history and its role in contributing to this death.

  16. Thank you, Carla.

  17. He played in one game for the Ohio State football team, and concussions in wrestling are the exception rather than the rule. One would think that if he had a significant problem with concussions, it would have stemmed from his high school football career. In terms of suicides in dumpsters, it is extremely rare.

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