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Letter to the Editor: Standing for social justice

To the Ohio State community:

On Oct. 23, the Washington Times published an opinion piece written by an Ohio State University Moritz College of Law student. The article, “The number one killer of black Americans,” describes how in 2011, “402 black Americans were aborted in America every single day.” As the Black Law Students Association at the OSU Moritz College of Law, our chapter is uniquely positioned to advocate on the issues of race relations and socioeconomic disparities in a productive and positive manner. We take offense to the racist undertones of this opinion piece and question its journalistic integrity.

This article challenges the principles of professionalism, scholastic integrity and common sense that we strive to uphold as Moritz law students. By making such sweeping and irresponsible statements regarding black women’s reproductive health, the opinion piece fails to address myriad factors that might influence a black woman’s decision to exercise her reproductive rights. The destructive generalizations made in this piece open the door for discussions regarding the larger issues that impact the black community. The article lacks consideration of relevant factors including, but not limited to racial inequalities, poverty and black women’s access to quality health care.

This article perpetuates that black women are the No. 1 killer of black Americans. We reject this notion. In making such sweeping implications, stereotypes of black Americans are recklessly perpetuated. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute, the leading causes of death in black Americans are heart disease, cancer and stroke. Access to affordable, quality health care is a significant factor in determining survival rates for black Americans. When discussing the mortality of black lives, lack of medical coverage, barriers to early detection and screening, and unequal access to improvements in treatments are equally important factors that desperately need to be incorporated into the conversation.

Our chapter wants to send a clear message to the greater OSU community that the Black Law Students Association is empowered to make a difference and to stand for social justice. We hope this continues to foster collaborative conversations directed toward addressing racial inequalities, better access to health care for black American women and other minorities, and the disproportionate effect that poverty has on black Americans. We strive to be a proactive catalyst for justice.

Respectfully,

The Black Law Students Association at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

7 comments

  1. A great bunch of bloviating, but come on, someday you will be lawyers. You will have to develop better arguments than just that your feelings are hurt (unless you can find really liberal, irresponsible judges).

    You objected to a column that stated a statistical fact. How does this have racist overtones? You gave no countering argument other that that your tender sensibilities were offended. Do you possibly think that such argument would hold up in a court room? Maybe with a far-left appointee on the bench, but not with a judge having a sense of responsibility.

    Here’s the challenge, up-and-coming lawyers – you were presented with a statistical fact. Now prove that this fact was incorrect (plenty of data out there). And base it upon provable data, not just that your whining sensibilities were hurt. I’d love to hear your take on black-on-black crime. Do I hear somebody else’s fault?

  2. You seem to take issue to the idea that “black women are the number one killers of black Americans,” but not to the fact that more black Americans are killed by abortion every year than by all other causes put together. The “myriad factors that might influence a black woman’s decision to exercise her reproductive rights” are immaterial to the fact that when she does so in a way that kills, she kills another person who happens to be black. When a woman of any race kills her unborn child, her child is dead and she has killed him/her. There is nothing racist about these conclusions, they are simply statements of who is dead and who has killed.
    Ms Gesiotto’s piece never accused black women of “being the number one killer of black Americans” — you did. As law students, you surely know that the person who hires another to kill is just as guilty of the killing. But most people blame abortionists, not women, for abortion deaths. There are very few abortionists; these few men and women kill a million unborn children every year.
    Is it shocking that more black babies are aborted every year than black Americans die of other causes? Yes — I hope you, and every American, finds it shocking. But to try to make that shocking truth go away by pretending that abortion doesn’t kill a human being is cowardly. The only way to make that truth go away is to make the abortions stop. If you are for “reproductive choices” that result in black death on a previously unimaginable scale, then have the courage to say so. “Black women have just as much right to kill their babies as white women do,” is a poor excuse for a moral or ethical principle, but that’s the one you’re claiming. Millions of Americans of all races are working for a day when no women will kill their children. For 57 million human beings, an outsized proportion of them black, it’s already too late.

    • Agreed, except for your using their term “reproductive rights.” That term is antithetical to what the truth is.

      “Higher education” is a place to 1) learn how to ‘think’ and 2) to search for truth. Obviously, The Black Law Students Association at The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law have decided to cling to the political party line which brought about this injustice in the first place.

  3. The Black Law Students Association of Ohio State U ,Moritz College of Law ‘s letter does not include the signer’s names. Hard to beleive that ALL the students agree with the content! Even from Canada we can follow up on the abortion stats in the US and know of Black organizations who cite the high numbers being carried out by organizations such as Planned Parenthood in their communities. As Law Students they should check facts before feelings especially before enterig the workforce and face real court cases where facts apply. I hope some will know when such feeligs only , start to affect legal matters and decisions.
    I hope too that ALL members of the Association can confirm one day, that they really do ”STAND for Social JUSTICE ”by recognizing the humanity of their unborn sisters and brothers killed by abortion.
    Wishing you well from Canada!

  4. “As the Black Law Students Association at the OSU Moritz College of Law, our chapter is uniquely positioned to advocate on the issues of race relations and socioeconomic disparities in a productive and positive manner. …

    “The article lacks consideration of relevant factors including, but not limited to racial inequalities, poverty and black women’s access to quality health care. …”

    So the BLSU claims it is “uniquely positioned to advocate on the issues of race relations and socioeconomic disparities” but you fail to do so after claiming the article fails to consider “relevant factors” related to race and socioeconomic disparities. If you’re going to call someone a racist, you have a duty to justify the accusation. And as law students, you have a duty to explain the reasons in detail.

  5. This letter is embarrassing. One hopes that the signatories come out in public as an aid to future employers passing on people of such little intellectual integrity.

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