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Concert review: Green Day revives punk in Columbus

(L-R) Musicians Tre Cool, Billie Joe Armstrong and Mike Dirnt of Green Day arrive at the 2012 'MTV Video Music Awards' in Los Angeles in 2012. Credit: Courtesy of TNS

(L-R) Musicians Tre Cool, Billie Joe Armstrong and Mike Dirnt of Green Day arrive at the 2012 ‘MTV Video Music Awards’ in Los Angeles in 2012. Credit: Courtesy of TNS

In the opening date on its sold-out club tour, Green Day proved to the audience at Newport Music Hall that no matter what your age is, whether you are a current teenager or were a teenager back when Green Day ruled the punk scene, its music is timeless.

Going back to its roots was the goal Green Day had in mind when the band announced the 11-city small venue tour in support of its newest album, “Revolution Radio.” The 2015 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees still wanted to prove that it could do punk in smaller settings. That is exactly what Green Day did on Monday.

In a set that lasted nearly two hours, Billie Joe Armstrong and company went through songs that span the band’s 30-year career, from most recent single “Bang Bang” to old favorites such as “When I Come Around” and “Welcome to Paradise.”

In the pit, the majority of the people were in their twenties, moshing especially to the politically-infused and critically-acclaimed songs from the band’s 2004 hit album, “American Idiot” including the album’s title track, “Jesus of Suburbia” and “St. Jimmy.” When it came to the older hits such as “She” and “Minority,” the venue became a sing along, with people, young and old, shouting along to Armstrong’s signature voice.

The band has plenty of showmanship. Armstrong was a flamboyant frontman, whith a constant call and response to the audience. Drummer Tré Cool gave ferocious drumming while showing his eccentric personality behind the drum set, and bassist Mike Dirnt’s was expressive and jumped around all over the stage during the set. Green Day showed Columbus that they still have a lot in the tank after a long and prestigious career.

 
After going down a path in the mid 2000’s that focused on political messages, Green Day has been trying for the past couple of years to get back to their roots, the punk scene. The political sector is still clearly an important part of this band’s identity, with Armstrong calling on concert attendees to vote and voicing his displeasure with the current political landscape. But the band’s focus is on the music and playing it loud and fast for people to mosh, to stage dive and to sing to.

One comment

  1. Get it right.............

    It’s called crowd surfing, not stage diving.

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