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Declining gas prices do little to fuel students’ fire

Despite some national and local reports of declining gas prices, some Ohio State students said they are not feeling the decrease, but the prices are not affecting their travel plans.
Data from AAA’s Daily Fuel Gauge Report show that national gas prices have been declining since they peaked in the beginning of April, and Ohio gas prices have been declining since March 1.
Some students said they choose to drive regardless of what they are required to pay at the pump.
Roger Neal, a fourth-year in economics, said he drives 5,000 to 6,000 miles a month to visit his son in Atlanta. He said he has not experienced a decline in gas prices.
“I drive more than anyone I know,” Neal said. “I haven’t found that gas is any cheaper. It might be $3.57 one week, but then it’s back up the next week.”
The national average price for regular unleaded gas is $3.73 per gallon, which is 24 cents lower than the national average price for gas last year, according to AAA.
The average price for regular unleaded gas in Ohio is less than the national average, at $3.63. This price is 40 cents below the average from last year, according to AAA.
When Karalyn Stark, a fourth-year in health science, went on a road trip with her friends to Florida during spring break, she said it was cheaper to drive and split the cost of gas rather than buy a plane ticket. But she said she would have gone on the trip regardless of the price of gas.
“You work hard so you can go,” Stark said.
Data from AAA shows that the national average price of gas peaked in 2011 on May 4 at $3.99. The national average price of gas peaked in 2012 on April 4 at $3.94.
Rachel Merry, a first-year in dance, is from Connecticut and said that while the price of gas does not affect when she goes home, it influences how she gets home.
“It influences how you go on a trip,” Merry said. “Depending on the price of gas, it might be cheaper to drive than fly.”
Multiple sources attribute the drop in gas prices to the lowered cost of crude oil. The U.S. Energy Information Administration forecasts that crude oil prices and retail gas prices will continue to decline through 2013.
Regular unleaded gas prices around campus averaged $3.65 Monday. The cheapest price for gas was $3.51 from the GetGo Fuel Station on 2845 N. High St., and the most expensive places to buy gas Monday were at the Exxon on 2187 Neil Ave. and the Shell on 15 E. Lane Ave. for $3.79, according to ColumbusGasPrices.com.
Jordan Cornwell, a second-year in security and intelligence, said gas prices don’t affect most of his travel plans, but they do impact his decisions for long-distance travel.
“I’m thinking about going to Myrtle Beach, but I’m still undecided,” he said. “But if gas goes up to $5, then I wouldn’t go.”
Devin Griglik, a second-year in interior design, said the price of gas does not affect her plans to go home to New Jersey, and that the price is something she accepts.
“I’m going to fill up no matter what it is,” Griglik said.

 

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